Sunday, 24 July 2011

Tick, tock...

Well I'm still waiting for these bees. I'm reliably told they're on the way. Failing that (if 'G' can't get me a viable queen cell and colony that way) he'll give me a ready made colony of his own bees.

I've had a fair bit on the go just lately at grow fish eat so I'm not too annoyed about the delay but I'm conscious of the bees needing to get some stores for the winter mounting up and get to a healthy population, so the sooner the better for me.

Anyway, here's a few snaps of the Borage bed I sowed a few weeks ago. The bees (honey and bumble bees) just love it. Plus it has the added advantage of smothering any weeds growing around or under it as the leaves are quite broad.

The bees love this stuff...
...apparently you can eat them too...
...and they're extremely beautiful plants.
I'm going to sow a huge row. Borage honey is delicious I'm told.

Hopefully more news shortly...

28 comments:

  1. Try to imagine a Pimms without Borage..... No I can't either!

    I was wondering what had happened to your bees, I'm looking forward to their arrival.

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  2. Borage honey is the best!! And yes, I have eaten the odd flower as I've walked through the garden and they taste nice too!! How exciting to be waiting for your bees! I've just become a chicken-keeper and waiting for them to become available was exciting enough! Keeping bees is somewhere on my list of things that I'd like to do and I was hoping to go on a local bee course this year, but couldn't find any, so I'm still at the 'reading up' stage. Will be watching your blog keenly to see how you get on!

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  3. Cro, I was wondering that too!

    Pippa, welcome.

    Glad you've decided to keep bees. Get yourself a mentor if you can't get on a course. Someone who keeps bees and knows their stuff. Worth a thousand courses.

    If you like chickens Pippa, then check out my other blog http://growfisheat.blogspot.com/ where there's soon to be a post on my new coop!

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  4. Got a lot of Borage here too. It seeds itself all over the place but I love the colour of the flowers, so I don't mind too much. I didn't know it was beneficial for the bees, so another plus there. Hope your bees arrive soon. I've never tasted borage honey - sounds nice!
    PS I've left a comment on your growfisheat blog too.

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  5. Anew shop opened 2 doors down from where I live on saturday. I bought 3 beeswax candles for just over a quid each. Not bad. A jug of Pimms costs about £ 25 around here, but it is served up by nubile wenches.

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  6. Woohoo-they are on their way! I was just thinking the other day "they" should have honey tastings like they have wine tastings. Clover honey, Borage honey, here in New Mexico they have Salt Cedar Honey. It would be so cool to get several different types/flavors together at one time to compare.

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  7. Chris....borage is a gorgeous shade of blue. I was just taking some pics of our plants the other day.They self seeded themselves which is a real treat...you never know where they are going to pop up...love the taste of borage I put it on my salads. Imagine borage honey..now that is something i'd love to try!

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  8. I think that borage honey will be fab. I have tasted a few 'single' flower honeys - raspberry was my favourite, but not so keen on chestnut. No word on my bees either - like you I have lots of other stuff going on to keep me going.
    Ps- you won a wee consolation surprise on my giveaway last week.

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  9. Excuse me, I'm new here. I followed Cro and Tom over your way. We raise bees here in Illinois, and I liked the pics of your bees so I think I might come back again if OK with you

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  10. That's just peachy with me Donna. Gonna mosey over to your place now.
    Anyone that follows TS and CM can't be all bad. Err, come to think of it...

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  11. I've been stung by the beekeeping fancy myself. Glad I found someone who is a beginner and keeping records of the process in great detail. Keep it up! When I'm ready to be a beekeeper, I'll know everything. ;-) Meanwhile I'll relish the times my silverado sage or pear cactus bloom, so I can study bees in action.

    The borage is gorgeous. Don't think it would grow easily in central Texas. I could definitely go for a honey-tasting party. I've had tupelo, wildflower and a honey from south Texas with a distinctive citrus flavor. Amazing how different they taste. I can't go back to the processed commercial honeys -- especially not for my tea.

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  12. I second Ron's comment! I better, or I'm in deep doo-doo! lol
    Love borage as well and eat some every time I walk past them. Borage honey would be great too! Do you ship to Canada? I would buy some!

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  13. I think I am excited for you as much as I am excited for me! :-)

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  14. I was told borage flowers taste like cucumbers, so I gave them a try. Nope, they taste like raw oysters. But yes, the bees do like them!!

    (I followed over from Mrs Bok... hi Mrs Bok... because I am keen on getting my own bees one day... soon!)

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  15. WHERE ARE THE BEES! (impatient aren't I!!)

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  16. I had a lot of bees late spring. They must be around somewhere! Here's to hoping they make it to your place very soon.

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  17. Hi, good to meet you!

    Borage makes good green manure/compost too, I grow it as it attracts bees to my allotment.

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  18. On another blog, there was made mention of making one's on mead! Mead! That what's you can do when you finally get your bees.....

    In all your spare time, of course....

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  19. Wow! Neat blog! My kids and I love the Bee-Thing...even found a massive hive over at Grandmas:)
    Patiently waiting with ya....:D

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  20. The borage looks amazing, and I second the vote for some mead! After the past couple of days, I could use some mead!

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  21. Chris what do you think of the Top Bar Hive by Philip Chandler? I downloaded the directions on how to build one. It looked easier to build than some of the other bee boxes. I thought I would get my DH to build me a couple if they are good boxes?

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  22. Hi all.

    This blog has been gathering dust hasn't it. I've been spending far too much time on Grow Fish Eat!

    A new post will be buzzing around shortly!!!!!!

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  23. Hi & Greetings.Chanced upon your blog.Fascinating pics of the bees sucking honey.The plant is lovely too. Have a great weekend.

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  24. Hello Chris, fellow lover of black pudding and love spoon crafter. Thanks for joining up as one of my followers. I have tried to talk to you straight but haven't been able to leave a comment - try again!

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  25. Wow,it worked this time. So I will say how much I like your borage photographs. Impressed with the true blue colours. I guess that's digital photography for you. In NZ the bee keepers market "blue borage' honey, but it comes from a different plant - vipers bugloss. Similar flowers though.
    Interested in the Barefoot Crofter's comment about chestnut flower honey. If it's sweet chestnut, I'm not surprised because the flowers have a distinctly semenal smell!

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  26. Well well well Chris a bee man too....I see your full of surprises. One of my contacts at work from Sweden keeps bees on his allotment and he sent me some through the post. Tasty it was, needless to say it didn't last long.

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